So the big news in the world of home theater today -or should I say cost-no-object home theater -is IMAX. That’s right, IMAX has gone public with the news that they will be offering a new, home IMAX cinema experience dubbed “IMAX Private Theatre.” The IMAX Private Theatre isn’t a new format or technology per se but rather a new set of standards placed upon theater design as well as equipment. All of which have been endorsed or created under the watchful eye of IMAX but are aimed not at the commercial cinema space but rather the consumer one.

3D rendering of an example of an IMAX Private Theatre taken from “Robb Report”. Image courtesy of Theo’s Roundtable.

Unlike most cost no object home theaters, the IMAX Private Theatre is not comprised of high-end consumer goods, but rather tailor made or modified professional products that will not work in a home environment. For example; all IMAX Private Theatres feature a dual DLP projection system for both 2D and 3D viewing. There are custom loudspeakers that are configured using IMAX’s proprietary setup techniques and equalization. The theater design is now also under the watchful eye of IMAX as the room itself must meet a barrage of requirements, not to mention be able to house an appropriately large, curved cinema screen. Then there is the 24/7/365 monitoring and technical support, which is handled by, you guessed it, IMAX.

Beyond what I’ve just told you there isn’t much more information at this time. The program is just getting started, though it owes its origins to a Robb Report ”experiment” some years ago. Needless to say the words Robb Report and IMAX mean this endeavor can’t be cheap. I’ve heard rumblings that an IMAX Private Theatre can cost into the millions, but at this point those figures may be little more than speculation. Needless to say, from the images and renderings I’ve seen, IMAX is dead serious about bringing their commercial cinema experience into the home. While I doubt many everyday consumers will have the chance to welcome such a luxury into their own homes, for the well heeled few who can, they’re bound to have a home cinema experience unlike any other.

While I may never experience it, I do find the presence of program such as the IMAX Private Theatre encouraging; for if successful, it could lead to future licensing opportunities -not unlike Dolby or DTS. In this capacity the IMAX brand, experience and knowledge could in fact trickle down to everyday folks -something I would very much be in favor of. Regardless, it’s a bold step by a company know for their bold cinematic endeavors.

As always I thank you so much for reading. Until next time, take care and stay tuned…

Andrew